Best Management Practices
  • Environmental Farm Plan
  • Enhancing Farmland Habitat
  • Farmland Management Overview
  • Organic Farming
  • Sustainable Agriculture
  • Supporting Local Farmers
  • Have a Property in Rural Ontario?

    Nature In Deed® is a portal to a wide range of information and resources about living in a rural environment. You'll find links to people and resource agencies who can provide information on just about any property-related question you may have.

    If you've never owned a property with a well or a septic system, where do you learn healthy ways to maintain them? If you're looking for information about managing your woodlot, about living with wildlife, about altering your shoreline or about starting up a small farm, we've done the research for you. If you want to talk to someone who has an understanding about specific local issues, then click on the link below for 'Who Can You Call for Help?'

    "/> Best Management Practices
  • Environmental Farm Plan
  • Enhancing Farmland Habitat
  • Farmland Management Overview
  • Organic Farming
  • Sustainable Agriculture
  • Supporting Local Farmers
  • Have a Property in Rural Ontario?

    Nature In Deed® is a portal to a wide range of information and resources about living in a rural environment. You'll find links to people and resource agencies who can provide information on just about any property-related question you may have.

    If you've never owned a property with a well or a septic system, where do you learn healthy ways to maintain them? If you're looking for information about managing your woodlot, about living with wildlife, about altering your shoreline or about starting up a small farm, we've done the research for you. If you want to talk to someone who has an understanding about specific local issues, then click on the link below for 'Who Can You Call for Help?'

    "/> Best Management Practices
  • Environmental Farm Plan
  • Enhancing Farmland Habitat
  • Farmland Management Overview
  • Organic Farming
  • Sustainable Agriculture
  • Supporting Local Farmers
  • Have a Property in Rural Ontario?

    Nature In Deed® is a portal to a wide range of information and resources about living in a rural environment. You'll find links to people and resource agencies who can provide information on just about any property-related question you may have.

    If you've never owned a property with a well or a septic system, where do you learn healthy ways to maintain them? If you're looking for information about managing your woodlot, about living with wildlife, about altering your shoreline or about starting up a small farm, we've done the research for you. If you want to talk to someone who has an understanding about specific local issues, then click on the link below for 'Who Can You Call for Help?'

    "/> Best Management Practices
  • Environmental Farm Plan
  • Enhancing Farmland Habitat
  • Farmland Management Overview
  • Organic Farming
  • Sustainable Agriculture
  • Supporting Local Farmers
  • Have a Property in Rural Ontario?

    Nature In Deed® is a portal to a wide range of information and resources about living in a rural environment. You'll find links to people and resource agencies who can provide information on just about any property-related question you may have.

    If you've never owned a property with a well or a septic system, where do you learn healthy ways to maintain them? If you're looking for information about managing your woodlot, about living with wildlife, about altering your shoreline or about starting up a small farm, we've done the research for you. If you want to talk to someone who has an understanding about specific local issues, then click on the link below for 'Who Can You Call for Help?'

    "/> ? <div id='columnMain'>Farmland Management Overview </div> <div id='columnSide'> <h2>Related Pages</h2> <ul><li><a href='/static/Best_Management_Practices' onclick="loadPage('Best_Management_Practices');return false;">Best Management Practices</a></li><li><a href='/static/EFP' onclick="loadPage('EFP');return false;">Environmental Farm Plan</a></li><li><a href='/static/Enhancing_Farmland_Habitat' onclick="loadPage('Enhancing_Farmland_Habitat');return false;">Enhancing Farmland Habitat</a></li><li class='selected'><a href='/static/Farmland_Management_Overview' onclick="loadPage('Farmland_Management_Overview');return false;">Farmland Management Overview</a></li><li><a href='/static/Organic_Farming' onclick="loadPage('Organic_Farming');return false;">Organic Farming</a></li><li><a href='/static/Sustainable_Agriculture' onclick="loadPage('Sustainable_Agriculture');return false;">Sustainable Agriculture</a></li><li><a href='/static/Supporting_Local_Farmers' onclick="loadPage('Supporting_Local_Farmers');return false;">Supporting Local Farmers</a></li></ul><h3>Have a Property in Rural Ontario?</h3> <p>Nature In Deed® is a portal to a wide range of information and resources about living in a rural environment. You'll find links to people and resource agencies who can provide information on just about any property-related question you may have.</p> <p>If you've never owned a property with a well or a septic system, where do you learn healthy ways to maintain them? If you're looking for information about managing your woodlot, about living with wildlife, about altering your shoreline or about starting up a small farm, we've done the research for you. If you want to talk to someone who has an understanding about specific local issues, then click on the link below for 'Who Can You Call for Help?'</p> </div>

    Nature In Deed

    Farmland Management Overview

    Mother goat with kidsIt's a challenging time to be a farmer in Canada. The agriculture census conducted in 2006 showed that the number of farms declined by over 7% in the previous five years (Statistics Canada) and has been declining steadily since the 1940s.

    However, the average size of farms is increasing, indicating that current political realities favour large, intensive farm operations, with a growing number in close proximity to urban centres. As many as 60% of Canadian farmers reported that their families are dependent on non-farm income.

    It's a challenging time to be a farmer in Canada. In 2011, Canada had 205,730 census farms, a decrease of 10.3% (or 23,643 farms) since the census in 2006 by Statistics Canada. The number of farms has been declining steadily since the 1940s.

    The 2011 Census of Agriculture counted 51,950 census farms in Ontario, a 9.2% decrease since 2006. This compares to a 10.3% decrease at the national level.

    The average age of a farm operator in Ontario in 2011 was 54.5 years compared with 52.6 years in 2006. Nationally, the average age of a farm operator in 2011 was 54.0 years, up from 52.0 years in 2006.

    In 2010, 47.8% of all Ontario farm operators had an off-farm job or business compared to 49.6% in 2005. At the national level, this percentage was 46.9% in 2010.

    Total farm area in Ontario decreased 4.8% between 2006 and 2011 to 12.7 million acres. Ontario reported 7.9% of the total farm area in Canada in 2011. The average area per farm was 244 acres in 2011, up from 233 acres five years earlier.

    Of the total farm area in Ontario in 2011, 70.5% was cropland, a slight increase from 68.0% reported in 2006. Farmers reported 8.9 million acres of cropland in Ontario in 2011, down from 9.0 million acres in 2006. The province accounted for 10.2% of cropland reported in Canada. Cropland is the total area reported in field crops, hay, fruits, field vegetables, sod and nursery. The average size of farms is increasing, indicating that current political realities favour large, intensive farm operations, with a growing number in close proximity to urban centres.

    If you are thinking you would like to start some sort farming operation or produce an agriculture product, Just Food - A Start-Up Farm Program is an excellent place to start. In 2013, Just Food established the Start-Up Farm Program to support new farmers in the Ottawa region. By offering access to land, shared infrastructure/equipment, and training, the program aims to enable more people in this region to start their own successful farm business. Program participants can access up to 3 years of on-site support at the Just Food Farm, at a subsidized rate building towards a cost-recovery basis. Many regions across Ontario have similar programs.

    Community-supported agriculture (CSA; sometimes known as community-shared agriculture) is an alternative, locally-based economic model of agriculture and food distribution. A CSA also refers to a particular network or association of individuals who have pledged to support one or more local farms, with growers and consumers sharing the risks and benefits of food production. This Fact Sheet explains how to become a CSA farmer. For more information visit the Ontario CSA Farm Directory.

    The Ontario Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Affairs provides information on how to Start a Farm in Ontario and the answers to frequently asked Questions.

    Farms at Work is an organization devoted to promoting healthy and active farmland in east central Ontario. They support farmers in diversification and expansion to ensure that farmland stays in production; ensure access to local farmer training opportunities; engage farmland owners who are non-farmers in active use of their land for agricultural purposes and create partnerships and outreach that result in on-the ground farm stewardship in the region.

    To be considered a farm business and, therefore, qualify for a reduced tax rate, a gross farm income of at least $7,000 must be declared. If your dream of rural living includes a small farm operation, don't let your idealism get in the way of solid research. Here are some places to start looking:

    Best Management Practices, published by the Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs, are a series of publications focused on conserving our soil and water without sacrificing agricultural productivity. These books are available at no cost through Service Canada at 1-800-668-9938.

    The Environmental Farm Plan (EFP) offers farmers a variety of cost-sharing programs to offset the price of reducing environmental risks on the farm. To be eligible for the EFP, an Ontario producer must generate over $7,000 gross income annually.

    A Factsheet of Programs and Services, offered by OMAFRA, summarizes what is currently available to farmers in Ontario to assist with the financial and business aspect of farm operations.

    Information sheets about a wide variety of environmental practices are also available from the OMAFRA website.

    The Ontario Soil and Crop Improvement Association (OSCIA)is a non-profit farm organization which offers a variety of information, resources and grants to farmers. It administers the environmental cost-share opportunities offered by OMAFRA through local representatives.

    The Rural Landowner Stewardship Guide helps you see your property in a new way. It asks you to think about your land, the buildings and structures on your land, and how your actions affect the larger landscape, from a new point of view. It provides a framework to allow you to evaluate your property and its management. Through completion of the worksheets, you will learn what you are doing right, and where you can improve in protecting our natural environment. This manual is available for download in PDF format, as well as extra worksheets to help you rate your activities.

    Caring For the Land is a website with a wealth of information and links about all of the work farmers are doing to protect the environment.

    Related Pages

    Have a Property in Rural Ontario?

    Nature In Deed® is a portal to a wide range of information and resources about living in a rural environment. You'll find links to people and resource agencies who can provide information on just about any property-related question you may have.

    If you've never owned a property with a well or a septic system, where do you learn healthy ways to maintain them? If you're looking for information about managing your woodlot, about living with wildlife, about altering your shoreline or about starting up a small farm, we've done the research for you. If you want to talk to someone who has an understanding about specific local issues, then click on the link below for 'Who Can You Call for Help?'

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