Enhancing Forest Habitat
  • Forest Certification
  • Good Forest Management Practices
  • Good Forestry Practices
  • Timber Management
  • Tree Planting Subsidy Programs
  • Maple Syrup Production
  • Tree Planting Subsidy Program
  • Tree Planting
  • Woodlot Management Overview
  • Restoring Old Growth Characteristics
  • Forest Health
  • Have a Property in Rural Ontario?

    Nature In Deed® is a portal to a wide range of information and resources about living in a rural environment. You'll find links to people and resource agencies who can provide information on just about any property-related question you may have.

    If you've never owned a property with a well or a septic system, where do you learn healthy ways to maintain them? If you're looking for information about managing your woodlot, about living with wildlife, about altering your shoreline or about starting up a small farm, we've done the research for you. If you want to talk to someone who has an understanding about specific local issues, then click on the link below for 'Who Can You Call for Help?'

    "/> Enhancing Forest Habitat
  • Forest Certification
  • Good Forest Management Practices
  • Good Forestry Practices
  • Timber Management
  • Tree Planting Subsidy Programs
  • Maple Syrup Production
  • Tree Planting Subsidy Program
  • Tree Planting
  • Woodlot Management Overview
  • Restoring Old Growth Characteristics
  • Forest Health
  • Have a Property in Rural Ontario?

    Nature In Deed® is a portal to a wide range of information and resources about living in a rural environment. You'll find links to people and resource agencies who can provide information on just about any property-related question you may have.

    If you've never owned a property with a well or a septic system, where do you learn healthy ways to maintain them? If you're looking for information about managing your woodlot, about living with wildlife, about altering your shoreline or about starting up a small farm, we've done the research for you. If you want to talk to someone who has an understanding about specific local issues, then click on the link below for 'Who Can You Call for Help?'

    "/> Enhancing Forest Habitat
  • Forest Certification
  • Good Forest Management Practices
  • Good Forestry Practices
  • Timber Management
  • Tree Planting Subsidy Programs
  • Maple Syrup Production
  • Tree Planting Subsidy Program
  • Tree Planting
  • Woodlot Management Overview
  • Restoring Old Growth Characteristics
  • Forest Health
  • Have a Property in Rural Ontario?

    Nature In Deed® is a portal to a wide range of information and resources about living in a rural environment. You'll find links to people and resource agencies who can provide information on just about any property-related question you may have.

    If you've never owned a property with a well or a septic system, where do you learn healthy ways to maintain them? If you're looking for information about managing your woodlot, about living with wildlife, about altering your shoreline or about starting up a small farm, we've done the research for you. If you want to talk to someone who has an understanding about specific local issues, then click on the link below for 'Who Can You Call for Help?'

    "/> Enhancing Forest Habitat
  • Forest Certification
  • Good Forest Management Practices
  • Good Forestry Practices
  • Timber Management
  • Tree Planting Subsidy Programs
  • Maple Syrup Production
  • Tree Planting Subsidy Program
  • Tree Planting
  • Woodlot Management Overview
  • Restoring Old Growth Characteristics
  • Forest Health
  • Have a Property in Rural Ontario?

    Nature In Deed® is a portal to a wide range of information and resources about living in a rural environment. You'll find links to people and resource agencies who can provide information on just about any property-related question you may have.

    If you've never owned a property with a well or a septic system, where do you learn healthy ways to maintain them? If you're looking for information about managing your woodlot, about living with wildlife, about altering your shoreline or about starting up a small farm, we've done the research for you. If you want to talk to someone who has an understanding about specific local issues, then click on the link below for 'Who Can You Call for Help?'

    "/> ? <div id='columnMain'>Good Forestry Practices </div> <div id='columnSide'> <h2>Related Pages</h2> <ul><li><a href='/static/Enhancing_Forest_Habitat' onclick="loadPage('Enhancing_Forest_Habitat');return false;">Enhancing Forest Habitat</a></li><li><a href='/static/Forest_Certification' onclick="loadPage('Forest_Certification');return false;">Forest Certification</a></li><li class='selected'><a href='/static/Good_Forest_Management_Practic' onclick="loadPage('Good_Forest_Management_Practic');return false;">Good Forest Management Practices</a></li><li><a href='/static/Good_Forestry_Practices' onclick="loadPage('Good_Forestry_Practices');return false;">Good Forestry Practices </a></li><li><a href='/static/Timber_Management' onclick="loadPage('Timber_Management');return false;">Timber Management</a></li><li><a href='/static/Tree_Planting_Subsidy_Programs' onclick="loadPage('Tree_Planting_Subsidy_Programs');return false;">Tree Planting Subsidy Programs</a></li><li><a href='/static/Maple_Syrup_Production' onclick="loadPage('Maple_Syrup_Production');return false;">Maple Syrup Production</a></li><li><a href='/static/Trees_Planting_Subsidy_Program' onclick="loadPage('Trees_Planting_Subsidy_Program');return false;">Tree Planting Subsidy Program</a></li><li><a href='/static/Tree_Planting' onclick="loadPage('Tree_Planting');return false;">Tree Planting</a></li><li><a href='/static/Woodlot_Management_Overview' onclick="loadPage('Woodlot_Management_Overview');return false;">Woodlot Management Overview</a></li><li><a href='/static/Restoring_Old_Growth_Characteristics' onclick="loadPage('Restoring_Old_Growth_Characteristics');return false;">Restoring Old Growth Characteristics</a></li><li><a href='/static/Forest_Health' onclick="loadPage('Forest_Health');return false;">Forest Health</a></li></ul><h3>Have a Property in Rural Ontario?</h3> <p>Nature In Deed® is a portal to a wide range of information and resources about living in a rural environment. You'll find links to people and resource agencies who can provide information on just about any property-related question you may have.</p> <p>If you've never owned a property with a well or a septic system, where do you learn healthy ways to maintain them? If you're looking for information about managing your woodlot, about living with wildlife, about altering your shoreline or about starting up a small farm, we've done the research for you. If you want to talk to someone who has an understanding about specific local issues, then click on the link below for 'Who Can You Call for Help?'</p> </div>

    Nature In Deed

    Good Forestry Practices

    Active management of a woodlot usually involves cutting certain trees. This may mean a commercial cut to remove mature trees and allow younger trees to grow. It may involve removing trees of poor form, trees with broken tops, or tree species of low value. Generally the better trees (good form, more desirable species) are allowed to continue to grow. In areas of polewood (trees less than 6 inches in diameter) the stems are often far too close together to allow the trees to grow well and these areas should be thinned to allow the better trees to grow more rapidly. But before starting any of these activities the entire property should be inspected, and a plan prepared for managing the woodlot.

    The starting point for good management is the preparation of a written management plan for the woodlot. There are many excellent guides to preparing a plan and the brief summary here is meant only to give an indication of what should be in a plan. Recommended guides include A Guide to Stewardship Planning for Natural Areas (MNR) and Code of Forestry Practice (Ontario Woodlot Association). A plan is usually written with a long time horizon, perhaps 20 years, and then management activities for a five or ten year period are included in the plan. The plan should then be updated after the five or ten year period. The main parts of a management plan are briefly described in the following section.

    Map: A plan includes a map of the property showing its location, roads, boundaries, building sites, steams, ponds, cleared areas etc. There are standard symbols used to describe various features and these are given in the references on management plans. The Stewardship Planning Atlas offers some great planning tools so you can make maps of your own property and choose which features you want to show.

    History: A brief history of the property is included, and the detail of this may vary greatly depending on the knowledge of the property by the owner. When available, the plan should include details of when harvesting has been carried out and whether areas that are now wooded have previously been cleared.

    Management Objectives: This section of the plan would give the overall objectives of the landowner for the property. The objectives may be primarily financial, recreational, environmental protection, etc. Even when the objectives are primarily financial, the forest’s inherent biological limits must be respected and any adverse effects on fish and wildlife habitat, remaining vegetation, soil and water must be minimized. The forest ecosystem’s resilience needs to be maintained to ensure future productivity.

    Compartments and Inventory: Most woodlots are divided into compartments for planning purposes. Each compartment consists of that part of the property having similar woodlands (i.e. coniferous forest, deciduous, mixed, wetlands), and the management objectives for these may vary greatly from one compartment to another. Each compartment is shown on a map, the compartment described and the management objectives for that compartment listed. If rare plants are found these would be listed in this section. If timber harvesting is contemplated in the near future (less than 5 years) then a more detailed inventory of the timber in the compartment is given. This inventory would list the tree species, their diameter measured 4.5 ft above the ground, the number of trees per acre, etc. Professional help in preparing this inventory is often required and this is discussed below.

    Operating Plan: In this section the activities to be undertaken in the period of the plan, 5 or ten years, are described. These activities may vary from simply maintaining trails, to building brush piles for wildlife, to undertaking major harvesting operations.

    In preparing the plan it is necessary for the owner to become familiar with all parts of the property. Many new landowners, especially those wishing to take part in the Managed Forest Tax Incentive Program (MFTIP), will engage the services of a MFTIP plan approver to assist with this task. A log of activities carried out in support of the plan should be maintained.

    Woodland Operations: If in preparing the management plan it is determined that areas of the woodlot have timber that could be commercially harvested, or that stands of younger trees should be thinned to allow the better trees to grow, then a landowner should call on the services of forestry professionals. In Ontario, members of two groups of forestry professionals, Registered Professional Foresters (RPFs) and Certified Tree Markers, are available to assist landowners in deciding which trees should be removed.

    In Ontario, only Registered Professional Foresters or members of the Ontario Professional Foresters Association are to prepare a prescription for a forestry cut. The prescription is a set of guidelines describing in general which trees should be removed from a stand and which trees should be protected or retained. The prescription would also note any areas that should not be harvested; for instance, a zone around certain raptor nests, buffers along waterways, areas containing rare plants, etc.

    Once a prescription has been prepared, a Certified Tree Marker should be employed to follow the prescription and mark the individual trees to be removed. The MNRF oversees the certification of tree markers and thus a landowner can have confidence that the tree marking is consistent with the prescription and in accordance with good forestry practice. Lists of forest consultants - including RPFs and Certified Tree Markers are available from the Ontario Woodlot Association.

    When a tree marker marks a bush for harvesting he will paint a line around the tree at breast height and will put a vertical line at the base of the tree. Thus, after logging all stumps should have the vertical line indicating that only marked trees were removed.

    Once the trees to be removed are marked, the next stage of the operation is the hiring of a logging contractor. There are several excellent guides describing the recommended procedure for selling standing timber. A landowner should be very careful when dealing with a logging contractor. Checking references to ensure that the contractor does what the landowner wants and is highly recommended. An excellent place to start looking for a logging contractor is the Ontario Woodlot Association’s Forest Service Directory, OntarioWoodlot.com.

    Related Pages

    Have a Property in Rural Ontario?

    Nature In Deed® is a portal to a wide range of information and resources about living in a rural environment. You'll find links to people and resource agencies who can provide information on just about any property-related question you may have.

    If you've never owned a property with a well or a septic system, where do you learn healthy ways to maintain them? If you're looking for information about managing your woodlot, about living with wildlife, about altering your shoreline or about starting up a small farm, we've done the research for you. If you want to talk to someone who has an understanding about specific local issues, then click on the link below for 'Who Can You Call for Help?'

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