Wildlife Habitat Mangement Overview
  • Living With Wildlife
  • Species At Risk
  • Endangered Species Act
  • Invasive Species
  • Enhancing Wildlife Habitat
  • Have a Property in Rural Ontario?

    Nature In Deed® is a portal to a wide range of information and resources about living in a rural environment. You'll find links to people and resource agencies who can provide information on just about any property-related question you may have.

    If you've never owned a property with a well or a septic system, where do you learn healthy ways to maintain them? If you're looking for information about managing your woodlot, about living with wildlife, about altering your shoreline or about starting up a small farm, we've done the research for you. If you want to talk to someone who has an understanding about specific local issues, then click on the link below for 'Who Can You Call for Help?'

    "/> Wildlife Habitat Mangement Overview
  • Living With Wildlife
  • Species At Risk
  • Endangered Species Act
  • Invasive Species
  • Enhancing Wildlife Habitat
  • Have a Property in Rural Ontario?

    Nature In Deed® is a portal to a wide range of information and resources about living in a rural environment. You'll find links to people and resource agencies who can provide information on just about any property-related question you may have.

    If you've never owned a property with a well or a septic system, where do you learn healthy ways to maintain them? If you're looking for information about managing your woodlot, about living with wildlife, about altering your shoreline or about starting up a small farm, we've done the research for you. If you want to talk to someone who has an understanding about specific local issues, then click on the link below for 'Who Can You Call for Help?'

    "/> Wildlife Habitat Mangement Overview
  • Living With Wildlife
  • Species At Risk
  • Endangered Species Act
  • Invasive Species
  • Enhancing Wildlife Habitat
  • Have a Property in Rural Ontario?

    Nature In Deed® is a portal to a wide range of information and resources about living in a rural environment. You'll find links to people and resource agencies who can provide information on just about any property-related question you may have.

    If you've never owned a property with a well or a septic system, where do you learn healthy ways to maintain them? If you're looking for information about managing your woodlot, about living with wildlife, about altering your shoreline or about starting up a small farm, we've done the research for you. If you want to talk to someone who has an understanding about specific local issues, then click on the link below for 'Who Can You Call for Help?'

    "/> Wildlife Habitat Mangement Overview
  • Living With Wildlife
  • Species At Risk
  • Endangered Species Act
  • Invasive Species
  • Enhancing Wildlife Habitat
  • Have a Property in Rural Ontario?

    Nature In Deed® is a portal to a wide range of information and resources about living in a rural environment. You'll find links to people and resource agencies who can provide information on just about any property-related question you may have.

    If you've never owned a property with a well or a septic system, where do you learn healthy ways to maintain them? If you're looking for information about managing your woodlot, about living with wildlife, about altering your shoreline or about starting up a small farm, we've done the research for you. If you want to talk to someone who has an understanding about specific local issues, then click on the link below for 'Who Can You Call for Help?'

    "/> ? <div id='columnMain'>Invasive Species </div> <div id='columnSide'> <h2>Related Pages</h2> <ul><li><a href='/static/Wildlife_Habitat_Management_Overview' onclick="loadPage('Wildlife_Habitat_Management_Overview');return false;">Wildlife Habitat Mangement Overview</a></li><li><a href='/static/Living_With_Wildlife' onclick="loadPage('Living_With_Wildlife');return false;">Living With Wildlife</a></li><li><a href='/static/Species_At_Risk' onclick="loadPage('Species_At_Risk');return false;">Species At Risk</a></li><li><a href='/static/Endangered_Species_Act' onclick="loadPage('Endangered_Species_Act');return false;">Endangered Species Act</a></li><li class='selected'><a href='/static/Invasive_Species' onclick="loadPage('Invasive_Species');return false;">Invasive Species</a></li><li><a href='/static/Enhancing_Wildlife_Habitat' onclick="loadPage('Enhancing_Wildlife_Habitat');return false;">Enhancing Wildlife Habitat</a></li></ul><h3>Have a Property in Rural Ontario?</h3> <p>Nature In Deed® is a portal to a wide range of information and resources about living in a rural environment. You'll find links to people and resource agencies who can provide information on just about any property-related question you may have.</p> <p>If you've never owned a property with a well or a septic system, where do you learn healthy ways to maintain them? If you're looking for information about managing your woodlot, about living with wildlife, about altering your shoreline or about starting up a small farm, we've done the research for you. If you want to talk to someone who has an understanding about specific local issues, then click on the link below for 'Who Can You Call for Help?'</p> </div>

    Nature In Deed

    Invasive Species

    Purple_LoosestrifeAn invasive species is one that spreads very quickly because it has been introduced to an area outside of its native range, where there are no natural predators to keep it under control. These invasive plants or animals can then outcompete the native species for food and habitat, sometimes resulting in a complete loss of the native species and ultimately less biodiversity.

    Humans often help spread invasive species unintentionally. A typical example was the introduction to North America of the beautiful purple loosestrife, which the early settlers brought in as an ornamental flower. When this plant overtakes a wetland, the native vegetation is lost as well as the fish, amphibians, waterfowl and insects that depended upon it for essential habitat.

    This is but one example of a growing number of invasive species, now over 500 world-wide. It's not unusual now for rural Ontarians to find dog-strangling vine in their woodlots or Eurasian milfoil in their lakes. Learning to identify and prevent the spread of these invaders is an important responsibility for all rural landowners.

    Hinterland Who's Who provides a thorough backgrounder about invasive species: what they are, how they got here, why the concerns, how they thrive, and what can be done.

    Field Guide to Aquatic Invasive Species is published by OMNRF to help you identify, collect and report aquatic invasives. It provides excellent photos and descriptions and tells you where you might expect to find each species.

    The Invading Species Awareness Program, sponsored by the Ontario Federation of Anglers and Hunters, provides excellent photos and fact sheets about some of the most common invasive species:

    The Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry provides some good information about invasive forest pests and diseases. Several downloadable guides for woodlot owners are available on this webpage.

    The Landowner's Guide to Controlling Invasive Woodland Plants provides good descriptions and clear photos of a variety of invasive woodland plants and explains what methods are available for their control. Another excellent resource is The Landowner's Guide to Managing and Controlling Invasive Plants.

    Environment Canada provides a full list of invasive species present in Canada, with links to a variety of other information sources.

    The Invasive Species Centre is a not-for-profit, partnership-based organization created in 2011 to be a leader in coordinating invasive species efforts in Ontario, Canada and the Great Lakes Basin with a focus on natural environments such as lakes and forests.

    Invasive Species: Management Options for the Ontario Landowner is an excellent 60-page booklet which describes the characteristics of invasive species (both terrestrial and aquatic) and what to do if you find any on your property. This booklet was produced by the Eastern Ontario Model Forest in partnership with the Ontario Woodlot Association and the Government of Canada and can be downloaded by the chapter.

    The Ontario Woodlot Association provides photos and descriptions of "most-wanted" invasive species in Ontario forests and suggested methods for control.

    Related Pages

    Have a Property in Rural Ontario?

    Nature In Deed® is a portal to a wide range of information and resources about living in a rural environment. You'll find links to people and resource agencies who can provide information on just about any property-related question you may have.

    If you've never owned a property with a well or a septic system, where do you learn healthy ways to maintain them? If you're looking for information about managing your woodlot, about living with wildlife, about altering your shoreline or about starting up a small farm, we've done the research for you. If you want to talk to someone who has an understanding about specific local issues, then click on the link below for 'Who Can You Call for Help?'

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