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  • Have a Property in Rural Ontario?

    Nature In Deed® is a portal to a wide range of information and resources about living in a rural environment. You'll find links to people and resource agencies who can provide information on just about any property-related question you may have.

    If you've never owned a property with a well or a septic system, where do you learn healthy ways to maintain them? If you're looking for information about managing your woodlot, about living with wildlife, about altering your shoreline or about starting up a small farm, we've done the research for you. If you want to talk to someone who has an understanding about specific local issues, then click on the link below for 'Who Can You Call for Help?'

    "/> Publications
  • Videos
  • Have a Property in Rural Ontario?

    Nature In Deed® is a portal to a wide range of information and resources about living in a rural environment. You'll find links to people and resource agencies who can provide information on just about any property-related question you may have.

    If you've never owned a property with a well or a septic system, where do you learn healthy ways to maintain them? If you're looking for information about managing your woodlot, about living with wildlife, about altering your shoreline or about starting up a small farm, we've done the research for you. If you want to talk to someone who has an understanding about specific local issues, then click on the link below for 'Who Can You Call for Help?'

    "/> Publications
  • Videos
  • Have a Property in Rural Ontario?

    Nature In Deed® is a portal to a wide range of information and resources about living in a rural environment. You'll find links to people and resource agencies who can provide information on just about any property-related question you may have.

    If you've never owned a property with a well or a septic system, where do you learn healthy ways to maintain them? If you're looking for information about managing your woodlot, about living with wildlife, about altering your shoreline or about starting up a small farm, we've done the research for you. If you want to talk to someone who has an understanding about specific local issues, then click on the link below for 'Who Can You Call for Help?'

    "/> Publications
  • Videos
  • Have a Property in Rural Ontario?

    Nature In Deed® is a portal to a wide range of information and resources about living in a rural environment. You'll find links to people and resource agencies who can provide information on just about any property-related question you may have.

    If you've never owned a property with a well or a septic system, where do you learn healthy ways to maintain them? If you're looking for information about managing your woodlot, about living with wildlife, about altering your shoreline or about starting up a small farm, we've done the research for you. If you want to talk to someone who has an understanding about specific local issues, then click on the link below for 'Who Can You Call for Help?'

    "/> ? <div id='columnMain'>Videos </div> <div id='columnSide'> <h2>Related Pages</h2> <ul><li><a href='/static/Protocols' onclick="loadPage('Protocols');return false;">Publications</a></li><li class='selected'><a href='/static/Videos' onclick="loadPage('Videos');return false;">Videos</a></li></ul><h3>Have a Property in Rural Ontario?</h3> <p>Nature In Deed® is a portal to a wide range of information and resources about living in a rural environment. You'll find links to people and resource agencies who can provide information on just about any property-related question you may have.</p> <p>If you've never owned a property with a well or a septic system, where do you learn healthy ways to maintain them? If you're looking for information about managing your woodlot, about living with wildlife, about altering your shoreline or about starting up a small farm, we've done the research for you. If you want to talk to someone who has an understanding about specific local issues, then click on the link below for 'Who Can You Call for Help?'</p> </div>

    Nature In Deed

    Walleye Spawning Bed Enhancement in Ontario

    The objective of this project was to increase spawning productivity and natural walleye populations of Dalhousie Lake by adding substrate and structure to existing and new spawning areas.

    Walleye, also known as pickerel, are a highly prized sports fish and an important part of the biodiversity in many waters of Ontario. If you have walleye in your lake or river, you may be able to help strengthen their populations by enhancing walleye spawning beds.

    Tons of oversized cobble stone were used to rehabilitate the spawning beds. In order to minimize effects on lake levels and river flows only one layer of rock was placed on the bottom. 

    This "how to" video features three different spawning bed projects undertaken by the Lanark County Stewardship Council in partnership with the Lanark County Stewardship Council in partnership with the Lanark Fish and Game Conservation Club, Mississippi Valley Conservation Authority, Dalhousie Lake Association and Watersheds Canada.

    Spawning bed project

    Before starting your own project you may want to consult our step by step protocol on Walleye Spawning Bed Enhancement in Ontario, available here [link]. It includes everything you will need to know, from planning and developing the project through to carrying it out successfully.

    This project was undertaken with the financial support of the Government of Canada.

    Ce projet a été réalisé avec l'appui financier du gouvernement du Canada.

     

    In-Water Brush Bundles

    Underwater woody debris is a healthy component of lake environments. Sunken logs, trees, branches, and root balls provide excellent habitat for wildlife, including fish, turtles, birds, invertebrates, and more. Beaver activity, wind, 

    erosion, or water inflows from rivers or creeks naturally deposit such woody debris into a lake. However, human activity and development have significantly reduced the amount of natural woody debris in lakes.

    Communities can promote the health of wildlife populations

    and improve water quality by creating additional woody debris habitat, such as in-water brush piles. Brush piles can provide fish with a food source, as well as shaded areas to rest, spawn, and escape predators.

    This "how to" video features an in-water brush bundle project undertaken by the Lanark County Stewardship Council in partnership with the Lanark Fish and Game Conservation Club, Mississippi Valley Conservation Authority, Dalhousie Lake Association and Watersheds Canada.

    Before starting your own project you may want to consult our step by step protocol on In-Water Brush Piles, available here [link]. It includes everything you will need to know, from planning and developing the project through to carrying it out successfully.

    This project was undertaken with the financial support of the Government of Canada.

    Ce projet a été réalisé avec l'appui financier du gouvernement du Canada.

    Related Pages

    Have a Property in Rural Ontario?

    Nature In Deed® is a portal to a wide range of information and resources about living in a rural environment. You'll find links to people and resource agencies who can provide information on just about any property-related question you may have.

    If you've never owned a property with a well or a septic system, where do you learn healthy ways to maintain them? If you're looking for information about managing your woodlot, about living with wildlife, about altering your shoreline or about starting up a small farm, we've done the research for you. If you want to talk to someone who has an understanding about specific local issues, then click on the link below for 'Who Can You Call for Help?'

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